Workplace stress and job satisfaction among child protective service workers in South Korea: Focusing on the buffering effects of protective factors

Youngsoon Chung, Jong Serl Chun

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

The aim of this study was to examine the relationships among workplace stressors including role ambiguity, role conflict, and role overload; organizational protective factors such as rapport with supervisor and client-centered supervision; personal protective factors including prosocial behavior and problem-focused strategies; and job satisfaction among a sample of Child Protection Services (CPS) workers in South Korea. Using a path analysis, the current study verified that rapport with supervisor, client-centered supervision, prosocial behaviors, and problem-focused strategies were protective factors among South Korean CPS workers; however, as protective buffers, each of these factors functioned differently against each stressor. We found that rapport with supervisor was a prominent protective factor against both role ambiguity and role conflict; problem-focused strategies had a protective effect against role ambiguity; and prosocial behavior and problem-focused strategies had other direct effects on job satisfaction. Based on our findings, we suggest implementing effective strategies to further develop rapport with supervisor, prosocial behavior, and problem-focused strategies for the purpose of increasing job satisfaction among CPS workers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)134-140
Number of pages7
JournalChildren and Youth Services Review
Volume57
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Oct 2015

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2015 Elsevier Ltd.

Keywords

  • Child protective service workers
  • Job satisfaction
  • Protective factors
  • South Korea
  • Workplace stressors

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