Work, family, support, and depression: Employed mothers in Israel, Korea, and the United States

Karen M. O'Brien, Heather V.Ganginis Del Pino, Sung Kyung Yoo, Rachel Gali Cinamon, Young Joo Han

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

33 Scopus citations

Abstract

Our research revealed differences in work-family constructs for employed mothers in 3 countries, Israel (N = 105), Korea (N = 298), and the United States (N = 305). Although levels of work-family conflict were comparable, the Korean women had the lowest levels of work-family enrichment compared with the Israeli and American mothers. Moreover, Korean women reported the most depression and the least support from both spouses and employers. Spousal support mediated the relationship between work- family conflict and depression for employed mothers in Israel, Korea, and the United States. As hypothesized by conservation of resources theory (Hobfoll, 1989, 1998, 2001), threat of resource loss (operationalized as work-family conflict) was related to depression more strongly than was resource gain (i.e., work-family enrichment).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)461-472
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Counseling Psychology
Volume61
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2014

Keywords

  • Depression
  • Employed mothers
  • Support
  • Work-family conflict
  • Work-family enrichment

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