What Makes Lessons Interesting? The Role of Situational and Individual Factors in Three School Subjects

Yi Miau Tsai, Mareike Kunter, Oliver Lüdtke, Ulrich Trautwein, Richard M. Ryan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

231 Scopus citations

Abstract

The present study investigated intraindividual variation in students' interest experience in 3 school subjects and the predictive power of perceived autonomy support and control. Participants were 261 students in 7th grade. After a survey of students' individual interests and other individual characteristics, repeated lesson-specific measures of students' interest experience and perceived autonomy support and control during instruction were obtained over a 3-week period. Hierarchical linear modeling showed 36%-45% of the variance to be located at the within-student level. Moreover, perceived autonomy support and control during lessons, as well as individual interest, predicted students' interest experience in the classroom.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)460-472
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Educational Psychology
Volume100
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2008

Keywords

  • autonomy support
  • individual interest
  • interest experience
  • repeated measurement design
  • self-determination theory

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