Volitional regulation of emotions produces distributed alterations in connectivity between visual, attention control, and default networks

Chandra Sripada, Michael Angstadt, Daniel Kessler, K. Luan Phan, Israel Liberzon, Gary W. Evans, Robert C. Welsh, Pilyoung Kim, James E. Swain

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

66 Scopus citations

Abstract

The ability to volitionally regulate emotions is critical to health and well-being. While patterns of neural activation during emotion regulation have been well characterized, patterns of connectivity between regions remain less explored. It is increasingly recognized that the human brain is organized into large-scale intrinsic connectivity networks (ICNs) whose interrelationships are altered in characteristic ways during psychological tasks. In this fMRI study of 54 healthy individuals, we investigated alterations in connectivity within and between ICNs produced by the emotion regulation strategy of reappraisal. In order to gain a comprehensive picture of connectivity changes, we utilized connectomic psychophysiological interactions (PPI), a whole-brain generalization of standard single-seed PPI methods. In particular, we quantified PPI connectivity pair-wise across 837 ROIs placed throughout the cortex. We found that compared to maintaining one's emotional responses, engaging in reappraisal produced robust and distributed alterations in functional connections involving visual, dorsal attention, frontoparietal, and default networks. Visual network in particular increased connectivity with multiple ICNs including dorsal attention and default networks. We interpret these findings in terms of the role of these networks in mediating critical constituent processes in emotion regulation, including visual processing, stimulus salience, attention control, and interpretation and contextualization of stimuli. Our results add a new network perspective to our understanding of the neural underpinnings of emotion regulation, and highlight that connectomic methods can play a valuable role in comprehensively investigating modulation of connectivity across task conditions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)110-121
Number of pages12
JournalNeuroImage
Volume89
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Apr 2014

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
C.S.'s research was supported by NIH grant K23-AA-020297 , University of Michigan Center for Computational Medicine Pilot Grant, and the John Templeton Foundation . G.E. was supported by the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities RC2MD004767, the W.T. Grant Foundation, and the John D. and Catherine T. Mac Arthur Foundation Network for Socioeconomic Status and Health. J.E.S. was supported by the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities RC2MD004767 and the Robert Wood Johnson Health and Society Scholar Award.

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