Urban green infrastructure and local flooding: The impact of landscape patterns on peak runoff in four Texas MSAs

Hyun Woo Kim, Yunmi Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

49 Scopus citations

Abstract

Even though there is a general acknowledgement that green infrastructure can have a positive role in reducing stormwater runoff, few studies have explored how specific spatial configurations of landscape—one of the critical components of green infrastructure—could influence runoff generation. This study attempts to address this gap by examining the landscape patterns in terms of size, shape, isolation, and connectivity across the four largest metropolitan areas in Texas, using landscape ecology metrics. The outcomes indicate that larger, less fragmented, and more connected landscape patterns are likely to mediate the mean annual peak runoff. In contrast, larger developments of complex shapes with more edges, clustered, and connected are likely to augment the peak runoff. The findings of this paper provide empirical evidences for policy makers to further the importance of interconnection and clusters of green infrastructure and plan strategic green hubs and corridors to more effectively manage stormwater runoff.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)72-81
Number of pages10
JournalApplied Geography
Volume77
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2016

Keywords

  • Green infrastructure
  • Landscape pattern
  • Local flooding
  • Peak runoff
  • Texas

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