Trajectory patterns for continuous metabolic syndrome score in childhood and the cardiovascular risk in adolescence

Eun Jeong Choi, Hye Ah Lee, Bomi Park, Bohyun Park, Hae Soon Kim, Young Sun Hong, Hyesook Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We explored the association between the trajectory of the continuous metabolic syndrome score (cMetS) in childhood with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT), which are known to increase cardiovascular disease risk in adolescence. The trajectory of cMetS in childhood (from 3 to 12 years of age) was identified in 833 children who participated in the Ewha Birth and Growth Study. The associations between cMetS and hs-CRP and CIMT were analyzed in 204 out of 833 children who participated in the follow-up at 13–15 years of age and measured hs-CRP and CIMT. Among the 833 children, three groups were classified: cMetS maintained at a low level (n = 198, 23.77%), middle level (n = 530, 63.63%), and at high levels (n = 105, 12.61%). The group with a stable-high cMetS trajectory showed significantly higher hs-CRP levels, and the statistical significance was maintained after adjusting for covariates. This study found that a consistently high cMetS in childhood was significantly associated with higher hs-CRP levels in adolescents, suggesting that it is necessary to intervene in metabolic risk factors early in life to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease later in life.

Original languageEnglish
Article number22564
JournalScientific Reports
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education (NRF-2017R1D1A1B03030088). It had no role in the design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021, The Author(s).

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