Trait self and true self: Cross-role variation in the big-five personality traits and its relations with psychological authenticity and subjective well-being

Kennon M. Sheldon, Richard M. Ryan, Laird J. Rawsthorne, Barbara Ilardi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

647 Scopus citations

Abstract

In 2 studies, college students evidenced differing levels of the "Big-Five" traits in different roles, supporting social-contextualist assumptions regarding trait expression. Supporting organismic theories of personality, within-subject variations in the Big Five were predictable from variations in the degree of psychological authenticity felt in different roles. In addition, two concepts of self-integration or true selfhood were examined: 1 based on high consistency of trait profiles across roles (i.e., low-self-concept differentiation; E. M. Donahue, R. W. Robins, B. W. Roberts, & O. P. John, 1993) and 1 based on high mean levels of authenticity felt across roles. The 2 self-integration measures were found to be independent predictors of psychological and physical well-being indicating that both self-consistency and psychological authenticity are vital for organized functioning and health.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1380-1393
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Personality and Social Psychology
Volume73
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1997

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