"They may be pixels, but they're MY pixels:" Developing a metric of character attachment in role-playing video games

Melissa L. Lewis, René Weber, Nicholas David Bowman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

95 Scopus citations

Abstract

This paper proposes a new and reliable metric for measuring character attachment (CA), the connection felt by a video game player toward a video game character. Results of construct validity analyses indicate that the proposed CA scale has a significant relationship with self-esteem, addiction, game enjoyment, and time spent playing games; all of these relationships are predicted by theory. Additionally, CA levels for role-playing games differ significantly from CA levels of other character-driven games.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)515-518
Number of pages4
JournalCyberpsychology and Behavior
Volume11
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Aug 2008

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The authors gratefully acknowledge financial support from National Science Foundation (NSF-CBET 1264599 and 1351384). We acknowledge the support of Maryland NanoCenter and its NispLab. The NispLab is supported in part by the NSF as a MRSEC Shared Experimental Facility. MRCAT operations are supported by the Department of Energy and the MRCAT member institutions. This research used resources of the Advanced Photon Source, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science User Facility operated for the DOE Office of Science by Argonne National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

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