The use of an in vitro adenosine triphosphate-based chemotherapy response assay to predict chemotherapeutic response in breast cancer

Hyun Ah Kim, Cha Kyong Yom, Byung In Moon, Kuk Jin Choe, Sun Hee Sung, Woon Sup Han, Hye Young Choi, Hye Kyoung Kim, Heung Kyu Park, Sung Ho Choi, Eun Jin Yoon, Soo Youn Oh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

26 Scopus citations

Abstract

The adenosine triphosphate-based chemotherapy response assay (ATP-CRA) has the advantages of standardization, evaluability, reproducibility, and accuracy, and can be performed on relatively small numbers of tumor cells. A total of 43 patients were enrolled in the present study, and chemosensitivity tests were successfully performed in 40 (93.0%) of these patients. Twenty of the 40 received neoadjuvant chemotherapy or chemotherapy for metastatic breast cancer. The chemotherapy regimens used were doxorubicin plus docetaxel (n=9, 45.0%) or doxorubicin plus paclitaxel (n=11, 55.0%). Mean cell death rate, as determined by ATP-CRA, was lower in non-responders than in responders to therapy (P=0.012). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and diagnostic accuracy for ATP-CRA were 78.6%, 100%, 100%, 66.7%, and 85.0%, respectively. Diagnostic accuracy achieved by immunohistochemistry using estrogen receptor or progesterone receptor was lower than that achieved using ATP-CRA. Expression of p53, erb-B2, Ki67, Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and annexin I was not significantly associated with response to chemotherapy. Our results show that ATP-CRA has high specificity and positive predictive value for predicting response to chemotherapy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)19-26
Number of pages8
JournalBreast
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2008

Keywords

  • Adenosine triphosphate-based chemosensitivity response assay
  • Breast cancer
  • Chemosensitivity
  • Tailored therapy

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