The prognostic model of pre-treatment complete blood count (CBC) for recurrence in early cervical cancer

Joseph J. Noh, Myong Cheol Lim, Moon Hong Kim, Yun Hwan Kim, Eun Seop Song, Seok Ju Seong, Dong Hoon Suh, Jong Min Lee, Chulmin Lee, Chel Hun Choi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The aim of the present study was to investigate the prognostic role of the pre-treatment complete blood count (CBC) profile as a predictive marker of survival, recurrence, and death in early stage squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma of the cervix. The pre-treatment CBC profiles of the patients from nine tertiary medical centers in South Korea who were treated surgically for early stage cervical cancer were reviewed. Statistical models by the Akaike’s information criterion (AIC) were developed using CBC profiles to calculate individuals’ risk scores for clinical outcomes. A total of 1443 patients were included in the study and the median follow-up was 63.7 months with a range of 3–183 months. Univariate analyses identified the components of CBC that were significantly related to clinical outcomes including white blood cell (WBC), hemoglobin, neutrophil, and platelet levels. The models developed using CBC profiles and the conventional clinical predictive factors provided individuals’ risk scores that were significantly better in predicting clinical outcomes than the models using the conventional clinical predictive factors alone. Pre-treatment CBC profiles including WBC, hemoglobin, neutrophil, lymphocyte, and platelet levels were found to be a potential biomarker for survival prognosis in early cervical cancer.

Original languageEnglish
Article number2960
Pages (from-to)1-13
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Clinical Medicine
Volume9
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2020

Keywords

  • Cervical cancer
  • Complete blood count
  • Prognosis
  • Statistical model

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