The mood effect: How mood, disclosure language and ad skepticism influence the effectiveness of native advertising

Taylor Jing Wen, Linwan Wu, Naa Amponsah Dodoo, Eunice Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This research investigated the interplay between mood, disclosure language, and ad skepticism on consumers' recognition and evaluation of native advertising. During two online experiments, participants first received a mood manipulation and then read an article-style native advertisement. Results from both studies indicated that participants were more likely to recognize a native ad with an explicit rather than an implicit disclosure label, and a negative mood was more likely than a positive mood to drive participants to recognize the native ad. More importantly, participants in a positive mood evaluated a native ad with an implicit disclosure more favorably than an ad with an explicit disclosure. By contrast, participants in a negative mood responded more positively to a native ad with explicit disclosure compared to an ad with implicit disclosure. Study 2 demonstrated that the interaction between mood and disclosure language was further moderated by individuals' levels of ad skepticism. These results are believed to provide meaningful theoretical and practical implications to the field of native advertising and consumer behavior.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1296-1308
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Consumer Behaviour
Volume22
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Sep 2023

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2023 The Authors. Journal of Consumer Behaviour published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

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