The Moderating Role of Sleep Quality on the Association between Neuroticism and Frontal Executive Function in Older Adults

Bori R. Kim, Ruda Lee, Nayeon Kim, Jee Hyang Jeong, Geon Ha Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective/Background: Personality traits are regarded as risk factors for cognitive impairment in older adults, while sleep disturbance and physical inactivity are also considered as modifiable risk factors. Therefore, it could be beneficial to investigate the effects of those modifiable risk factors on the relationship between personality traits and cognitive functions, to prepare appropriate strategies for mitigating cognitive impairment. Participants: A total of 155 cognitively unimpaired older adults were included. Methods: All participants underwent cognitive function tests using the Seoul Neuropsychological Screening Battery and examinations for personality traits using the Big Five Inventory. Individual physical activity and sleep quality were assessed using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, respectively. A hierarchical linear multiple regression analysis was performed to demonstrate the direct association between personality traits and cognitive functions, and the multiple moderator analysis was used to analyze the moderating effects of lifestyle factors on this association. Results: Among the five personality traits, only neuroticism was negatively associated with the frontal executive and visuospatial functions after controlling age, sex, and years of education. Interestingly, the negative relationship between neuroticism and frontal executive function was alleviated in older adults with higher sleep quality. Conclusions: Our findings demonstrated that higher sleep quality has significant moderating effects on the negative association between neuroticism and frontal executive functions in older adults, which suggests intervention for improving sleep quality such as cognitive behavioral therapy can be considered in older adults who have personality traits associated with a high risk of cognitive impairment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)50-62
Number of pages13
JournalBehavioral Sleep Medicine
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This research was supported by the grant funded by a?Korean society of geriatric neurology, by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) Grants funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning (NRF-2020M3C1B6112160), by the Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education (NRF-2020R1I1A1A01072283) and?by a grant of the Korea Health Technology R&D Project through the Korea Health Industry Development Institute (KHIDI), funded by the Ministry of Health & Welfare and Ministry of science and ICT, Republic of Korea (HU20C0271).

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

Keywords

  • cognitive function
  • frontal executive function
  • neuroticism
  • sleep quality

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