The Mediating Effect of Inflammation between the Dietary and Health-Related Behaviors and Metabolic Syndrome in Adolescence

Ui Jeong Kim, Eun Jeong Choi, Hyunjin Park, Hye Ah Lee, Bomi Park, Haesoon Kim, Youngsun Hong, Seungyoun Jung, Hyesook Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Chronic diseases develop via complex pathways, depending on the degree of exposure to risk factors from early in life and childhood onward. Metabolic syndrome has multiple risk factors, including genetic factors, inappropriate diet, and insufficient physical activity. This study classified health-related behavior classes in childhood and adolescents and analyzed the direct and indirect effects of each class on the metabolic risk in inflammation-mediated pathways. We identified the health-related lifestyle classes based on health-related behavior indicators in subjects aged 3–15 years who participated in the Ewha Birth and Growth Cohort Study by using a latent class analysis. A mediation analysis was performed to access the direct and indirect effects of each class on the continuous metabolic syndrome score (cMetS), with the inflammatory index used as a mediating factor. Subjects were classified into inactive and posi-tive lifestyle classes according to their characteristics. In the inactive lifestyle class, interleukin (IL)-6 and cMetS had a significant association. The study confirmed that IL-6 exerts a significant indirect effect between inactive lifestyle and cMetS. This result supports previous studies. Since the health behaviors of children and adolescents can affect the likelihood of subsequent metabolic syndrome, appropriate health behavior interventions for this period are needed.

Original languageEnglish
Article number2339
JournalNutrients
Volume14
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jun 2022

Keywords

  • cohort
  • health-related behavior
  • latent class analysis
  • mediation analysis
  • metabolic syndrome

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