The Emotional and Academic Consequences of Parental Conditional Regard: Comparing Conditional Positive Regard, Conditional Negative Regard, and Autonomy Support as Parenting Practices

Guy Roth, Avi Assor, Christopher P. Niemiec, Richard M. Ryan, Edward L. Deci

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

294 Scopus citations

Abstract

The authors conducted 2 studies of 9th-grade Israeli adolescents (169 in Study 1, 156 in Study 2) to compare the parenting practices of conditional positive regard, conditional negative regard, and autonomy support using data from multiple reporters. Two socialization domains were studied: emotion control and academics. Results were consistent with the self-determination theory model of internalization, which posits that (a) conditional negative regard predicts feelings of resentment toward parents, which then predict dysregulation of negative emotions and academic disengagement; (b) conditional positive regard predicts feelings of internal compulsion, which then predict suppressive regulation of negative emotions and grade-focused academic engagement; and (c) autonomy support predicts sense of choice, which then predicts integrated regulation of negative emotions and interest-focused academic engagement. These findings suggest that even parents' use of conditional positive regard as a socialization practice has adverse emotional and academic consequences, relative to autonomy support.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1119-1142
Number of pages24
JournalDevelopmental Psychology
Volume45
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2009

Keywords

  • academic engagement
  • autonomy support
  • emotion regulation
  • parental conditional regard

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