The effects of narrative messages on optimistic bias in South Korea: a focus on controllability, collectivism, and risk perception in a massive fire crisis

Yungwook Kim, Jiyoung Lee, Seungkyung Ham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined the effect of narrative messages of a massive fire crisis on optimistic bias by experimentally comparing the effect of narrative describing a personal story on the crisis incident and that of non-narrative message (Study 1). Researchers further sought the interaction between controllability and the narrative message and the mediated moderation model of risk perception. In Study 2, the effect of narrative message describing a group story on the crisis incident on optimistic bias was further tested in terms of South Korea’s collectivistic culture. Collectivism, along with controllability, was used as a moderator, and mediated moderation models of risk perception were tested. The present research offers several major findings: (1) a narrative message describing a personal story decreased optimistic bias, (2) among people who read a narrative describing a personal story, those with high controllability had a lower level of optimistic bias than those with low controllability, (3) among people who read the narrative of a group story, those with high collectivism had a lower level of optimistic bias than those with low collectivism, and (4) the interaction between message types and collectivism affected risk perception and this risk perception increased optimistic bias. Theoretical implications of these findings are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)638-657
Number of pages20
JournalAsian Journal of Communication
Volume28
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2 Nov 2018

Keywords

  • Narrative message
  • collectivism
  • controllability
  • optimistic bias
  • risk perception

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The effects of narrative messages on optimistic bias in South Korea: a focus on controllability, collectivism, and risk perception in a massive fire crisis'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this