The effects of galantamine treatment on attention and its relationship with cognition and activities of daily living in patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease

Jae Hong Lee, Yun Jeong Hong, Hee Joon Bae, Beom Joon Kim, Duk Lyul Na, Seol Heui Han, Jong Moo Park, Jee Hyang Jeong, Kyung Ryeol Chag

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5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background and PurposezzThe positive effects of galantamine on cognition and activities of daily living (ADL) in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are thought to be mediated via improvements in attention. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of galantamine on attention in AD patients using a computerized attention test and to elucidate the relationship between improvements in attention and change in cognition and ADL. MethodszzIn this multicenter, open-label, prospective study, patients with mild to moderate AD received galantamine and then submitted to computerized attention tests, the Alzheimer’s Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale, and instrumental ADL (IADL) at baseline, 4 weeks, and 12 weeks. The differences in reaction time on computerized tests were explored relative to the changes in cognition and IADL. ResultszzAfter 12 weeks of taking the trial medication there was a significant reduction from baseline levels in the choice reaction time (baseline, 5,216±3,650 sec; 12 weeks, 4,139±2,920 sec; p<0.01) and the simple reaction time (baseline, 1,089±782 sec; 12 weeks, 908±606 sec; p<0.01). Correlation analyses of changes in choice or simple reaction times relative to cognition and ADL measures yielded no significant associations. The improvement in attention observed at 4 weeks of galantamine treatment was not associated with any significant changes in outcome measures at the end of trial. ConclusionszzThis study found no significant association between the improvement in attention after treatment with galantamine and changes in cognition and ADL in patients with mild to moderate AD, despite the significant improvement in attention over the course of the treatment. Background and PurposezzThe positive effects of galantamine on cognition and activities of daily living (ADL) in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are thought to be mediated via improvements in attention. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of galantamine on attention in AD patients using a computerized attention test and to elucidate the relationship between improvements in attention and change in cognition and ADL. MethodszzIn this multicenter, open-label, prospective study, patients with mild to moderate AD received galantamine and then submitted to computerized attention tests, the Alzheimer’s Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale, and instrumental ADL (IADL) at baseline, 4 weeks, and 12 weeks. The differences in reaction time on computerized tests were explored relative to the changes in cognition and IADL. ResultszzAfter 12 weeks of taking the trial medication there was a significant reduction from baseline levels in the choice reaction time (baseline, 5,216±3,650 sec; 12 weeks, 4,139±2,920 sec; p<0.01) and the simple reaction time (baseline, 1,089±782 sec; 12 weeks, 908±606 sec; p<0.01). Correlation analyses of changes in choice or simple reaction times relative to cognition and ADL measures yielded no significant associations. The improvement in attention observed at 4 weeks of galantamine treatment was not associated with any significant changes in outcome measures at the end of trial. ConclusionszzThis study found no significant association between the improvement in attention after treatment with galantamine and changes in cognition and ADL in patients with mild to moderate AD, despite the significant improvement in attention over the course of the treatment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)66-72
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Clinical Neurology (Korea)
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

Keywords

  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Attention
  • Computerized test
  • Galantamine

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