Suicide Stigma in Online Social Interactions: Impacts of Social Capital and Suicide Literacy

Soontae An, Hannah Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined whether and when people are more likely to conform to stigmatizing views on suicide in online social interactions. Two key factors in the study included characteristics of individuals’ social capital and suicide literacy. Study 1 analyzed national survey data to explore the relationships, and Study 2 involved a vignette to gauge the extent to which people conform to stigmatizing attitudes toward suicidal people under group pressure. Results showed that those emphasizing social networks demonstrated higher levels of suicide stigma, while those with more interpersonal trust showed lower levels of stigma. However, in relation to interpersonal trust, suicide literacy played a moderating role in that those with lower levels of interpersonal trust showed significantly less conformity when they had high suicide literacy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1340-1349
Number of pages10
JournalHealth Communication
Volume34
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - 2019

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