Subjective Well-Being in Older Chinese and Korean Immigrants in the United States: Effects of Self-Rated Health and Employment Status

Bum Jung Kim, Hyeyoun Jun, Jisun Lee, Kristen Linton, Meehye Kim, Colette Browne

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined the effects of association between self-rated health and employment status on subjective well-being among older Chinese and Korean immigrants in the United States. Data were collected from 171 Chinese and 205 Korean older adult immigrants living in Los Angeles County. The primary variables included demographic data, subjective index of well-being, self-rated health, and employment status. Data support the association between self-rated health and subjective well-being for both groups. Employment, education, and age were associated with the level of subjective well-being only for older Korean immigrants. Similarities and differences were noted in these two Asian American subgroups. Findings suggest the need to develop health promotion services for both populations and employment opportunities targeted more so for Korean older immigrants to further support their subjective well-being. Results may have implications for other for older immigrants.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)510-520
Number of pages11
JournalSocial Work in Public Health
Volume32
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 17 Nov 2017

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2017 Taylor & Francis.

Keywords

  • employment status
  • older Chinese immigrants
  • older Korean immigrants
  • Self-rated health
  • subjective well-being

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