Structural brain changes after traditional and robot-assisted multi-domain cognitive training in community-dwelling healthy elderly

Geon Ha Kim, Seun Jeon, Kiho Im, Hunki Kwon, Byung Hwa Lee, Ga Young Kim, Hana Jeong, Noh Eul Han, Sang Won Seo, Hanna Cho, Young Noh, Sang Eon Park, Hojeong Kim, Jung Won Hwang, Cindy W. Yoon, Hee Jin Kim, Byoung Seok Ye, Ju Hee Chin, Jung Hyun Kim, Mee Kyung SuhJong Min Lee, Sung Tae Kim, Mun Taek Choi, Mun Sang Kim, Kenneth M. Heilman, Jee Hyang Jeong, Duk L. Na

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

51 Scopus citations

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate if multi-domain cognitive training, especially robot-assisted training, alters cortical thickness in the brains of elderly participants. A controlled trial was conducted with 85 volunteers without cognitive impairment who were 60 years old or older. Participants were first randomized into two groups. One group consisted of 48 participants who would receive cognitive training and 37 who would not receive training. The cognitive training group was randomly divided into two groups, 24 who received traditional cognitive training and 24 who received robot-assisted cognitive training. The training for both groups consisted of daily 90-min-session, five days a week for a total of 12 weeks. The primary outcome was the changes in cortical thickness. When compared to the control group, both groups who underwent cognitive training demonstrated attenuation of age related cortical thinning in the frontotemporal association cortices. When the robot and the traditional interventions were directly compared, the robot group showed less cortical thinning in the anterior cingulate cortices. Our results suggest that cognitive training can mitigate age-associated structural brain changes in the elderly.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0123251
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume10
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 21 Apr 2015

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