Smartphone addiction and anxiety in adolescents – A cross-sectional study

Kitai Kim, Jeong Yee, Jee Eun Chung, Hyun Jeong Kim, Ji Min Han, Joo Hee Kim, Kyung Eun Lee, Hye Sun Gwak

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: The overuse of smartphones affects physical, social, and psychological well-being. However, research on smartphone addiction and anxiety disorders is scarce. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the association between anxiety and smartphone addiction risk in Korean adolescents. Methods: This study used a cross-sectional survey method. We used the Revised Children’s Manifest Anxiety Scale to assess anxiety symptoms and we used the Korean Smartphone Addiction Proneness Scale index to evaluate the degree of high-risk or at-risk for smartphone addiction. Results: Analyses were performed for 1733 adolescents, including 771 boys and 962 girls. The high-risk or at-risk group for smartphone addiction accounted for 20.1% (p < .0001). Total anxiety scale score, as well as physiological anxiety, oversensitivity, and social concern categories were statistically different among levels of smartphone addiction risk (all ps < .0001). Multivariate analysis showed that poor self-reported health level, higher risk of smartphone addiction, having fewer close friends, caffeine drink consumption, female sex, and alcohol use were associated with greater anxiety. Conclusions: Management of smartphone addiction seems to be essential for proper psychological health. There is an urgent need to develop a way to prevent smartphone addiction on a social level.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)895-901
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Health Behavior
Volume45
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2021

Keywords

  • Adolescent
  • Anxiety
  • Korean smartphone addiction proneness scaleProneness Scale
  • Revised children’s manifest anxiety scale
  • Smartphone addiction

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