Serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and breast cancer risk by menopausal status, body mass index, and hormonal receptor in Korea

Yeonju Kim, Sue K. Park, Wonshik Han, Dong Hyun Kim, Yun Chul Hong, Eun Hee Ha, Sei Hyun Ahn, Dong Young Noh, Daehee Kang, Keun Young Yoo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

60 Scopus citations

Abstract

High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) has been suggested to be associated with breast cancer. However, the roles of HDL-C and hypertriglyceridemia on breast cancer still have been controversial. The goal of this study was to investigate the association between HDL-C with breast cancer risk, stratifying by menopausal status, and body mass index. The hormonal receptor status of breast has been proposed to modify the effect of HDL-C on breast cancer. Multicenter hospital-based case-control study was conducted from November 2004 to December 2005 in Korea. After one to two individual matchings by age (±5 years) and menopausal status, 690 cases and 1,380 controls were included in the analysis. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were estimated by conditional, unconditional, and multinomial logistic regressions. Protective effect of HDL-C on breast cancer was only observed among premenopausal women with an OR (95% CI) of 0.49 (0.33-0.72) for HDL-C ≥60 versus <50 mg/dL (Ptrend < 0.01). Only nonobese premenopausal women had a significant decreased risk (OR, 0.34; 95% CI, 0.22-0.53). OR (95% CI) of low HDL-C (<50 mg/dL) and high triglyceride (TG; ≥150 mg/dL) category was 2.20 (1.32-3.67) on estrogen receptor-negative and progesterone receptor-negative breast cancer compared with high HDL-C (≥50 mg/dL) and low TG (<150 mg/dL) category. This study suggests that higher level of HDL-C may reduce breast cancer risk among premenopausal women. Estrogen receptor-negative and progesterone receptor-negative breast cancer was associated with dyslipidemia, which implicates that association among HDL-C, TG, and breast cancer may be modified by eceptor status.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)508-515
Number of pages8
JournalCancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention
Volume18
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2009

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