Self-perceptions, motivation, and adjustment in children with learning disabilities: a multiple group comparison study.

W. S. Grolnick, R. M. Ryan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

111 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined the self-perceptions, motivational orientations, and classroom adjustment of children with learning disabilities (LD), matched-IQ non-LD, randomly selected non-LD, and low achieving children. Elementary-age children (N = 148; 37 from each group) completed domain-specific measures of their self-concepts, perceptions of control, and motivation. Teachers rated children on motivational and competence indices and classroom behavioral adjustment. Comparisons among groups indicated that children with LD were lower in perceived cognitive competence and academic self-regulation relative to the nondisabled control groups, but were comparable to the low achieving children. Children with LD were most likely to perceive academic outcomes as controlled by powerful others. No group differences were found for general self-perceptions of control or competence. Teacher ratings of children with LD were more discrepant from those of comparison groups than were self-ratings of children with LD. The results suggest the need for matched-IQ and low achieving control groups in research on children with LD. The origin and role of both environmental inputs and self-perceptions in the adjustment of students with LD are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)177-184
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of learning disabilities
Volume23
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1990

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