Self-complexity and the authenticity of self-aspects: Effects on well being and resilience to stressful events

Richard M. Ryan, Jennifer G. LaGuardia, Laird J. Rawsthorne

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

71 Scopus citations

Abstract

Two studies examine the relations of self-complexity (Linville, 1987) and the authenticity of self-aspects to well being. Study 1 results show that self-complexity is largely unrelated to well being, whereas the authenticity of the self-aspects that constitute it is associated with greater well being. Study 2 uses a two-week, prospective design to replicate Linville's finding of a buffering effect of complexity on the negative outcomes associated with stressful events. In addition, study 2 results revealed either null or negative relations of complexity to well being, whereas the authenticity of self-aspects was again positively related to well being. The findings are discussed with respect to the meaning of self-complexity for personality functioning, and the importance of having one's self-aspects be authentic.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)431-448
Number of pages18
JournalNorth American Journal of Psychology
Volume7
Issue number3
StatePublished - 2005

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