Safety and efficacy of the percutaneous manual aspiration thrombectomy technique to treat thrombotic occlusion of native arteriovenous fistulas for hemodialysis

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Abstract

Purpose To evaluate the safety and efficacy of the percutaneous manual aspiration thrombectomy technique to treat thrombotic occlusion of native arteriovenous fistulas. Materials and Methods A retrospective review of 20 patients who underwent percutaneous manual aspiration thrombectomy for native thrombotic arteriovenous fistula occlusion from March 2012 to December 2017 was performed. We evaluated technical and clinical success rates and complications. The primary and secondary patency rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier analysis. Results Percutaneous manual aspiration thrombectomy was performed in 20 patients (n = 20) with concomitant balloon angioplasty. The overall technical and clinical success rates were both 85% (n = 17). The native arteriovenous fistulas, based on their site, were the left radiocephalic (n = 13), left brachiocephalic (n = 4), and right radiocephalic (n = 3) fistulas. An underlying stenosis was detected in the juxta-anastomotic venous site (n = 16), outflow draining vein (n = 12), and central vein (n = 4). The primary and secondary patency rates at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months were 100%, 70.6%, 70.6%, and 56.5% and 100%, 94.1%, 94.1%, and 86.9%, respectively. There were no complications associated with procedure. Conclusion Percutaneous manual aspiration thrombectomy is a safe and effective method to treat thrombotic native arteriovenous fistula occlusion.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)409-417
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the Korean Society of Radiology
Volume81
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2020

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
Copyrights © 2020 The Korean Society of Radiology.

Keywords

  • Arteriovenous Fistula
  • Thrombectomy
  • Thrombosis

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