Reminder–preference test, affective difference-preference test using reference framing with a brand: 1. Sensitivity comparisons with the same–different difference–preference test

Min A. Kim, Ye Jin Lee, Myung Shin Kim, Hye Seong Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Attempts to reduce the sugar content of carbonated drinks are ongoing. Reducing the sugar content while maintaining the sensory quality requires the development of an effective sensory test method that can measure a consumers’ perceived sensory difference and preference of reformulated products against the reference product. The A-Not A with reminder (A-Not AR) method (sometimes called the reminder method) allows blind sensory tests of multiple test samples vs. a reference, while for the reference, marketing information, such as brand name and advertisements emphasizing the consumer benefit, can be provided to improve the marketing effects and consumer expectation. Thus, a preference test method can also simulate branded tests using A-Not AR design with a branded reference, making them suitable for consumer sensory tests. In the present study, an affective difference-preference test method using an A-Not AR design with the reference familiarization procedure of providing marketing information was developed, called the “reminder–preference test”. The “reminder–preference test” sensitivity was compared with the previously suggested version of the “same–different difference–preference test”, using signal detection d′ analyses. A lemon-lime flavored carbonated drink was used as the reference and compared with two types of reformulations. The consumers were divided randomly into two groups that performed one of the two difference-preference test methods. With the “reminder–preference test”, the consumers watched a commercial advertisement for the reference by providing its brand name before the tests to evoke the marketing effects. The proposed sensory test of the “reminder–preference test” was more sensitive than the “same–different difference–preference test”, in terms of both sensory and preference discriminations. Hence, brand effects can be incorporated into the consumer sensory evaluation to achieve the reformulation objective and the potential of the “reminder–preference test” and its signal detection d′ analyses to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of consumer sensory measurements.

Original languageEnglish
Article number111065
JournalFood Research International
Volume155
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2022

Keywords

  • A-Not A with reminder
  • Difference-preference test
  • Marketing effect
  • Paired-preference test
  • Reformulation
  • Sugar reduction

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Reminder–preference test, affective difference-preference test using reference framing with a brand: 1. Sensitivity comparisons with the same–different difference–preference test'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this