Relationship between serum total cholesterol level and serum biochemical bone turnover markers in healthy pre- and postmenopausal women

Tae Dong Jeong, Woochang Lee, Sung Eun Choi, Jae Seung Kim, Hong Kyu Kim, Sung Jin Bae, Sail Chun, Won Ki Min

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27 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background. The presence of common risk factors suggests that there is a relationship between osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease, possibly via dyslipidemia and inflammation. We investigated the relationships among the lipid profile, the inflammation marker high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), bone turnover markers, and bone mineral density (BMD) to assess the correlation between osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease and identify factors predicting osteoporosis. Methods. The study included 759 Korean women older than 20 years of age. The BMD, serum lipid profile, and levels of hsCRP, cross-linked C-terminal peptide (CTX), and osteocalcin were measured. We compared the serum biomarkers between groups with normal and low BMD and assessed the correlations between the levels of bone turnover markers and the lipid profile and hsCRP level. Results. The concentrations of CTX, osteocalcin, and total cholesterol were significantly higher in the low BMD group than in the normal BMD group in premenopausal women group. However, hsCRP was not correlated with these parameters. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that TC (OR, 1.647; 95% CI, 1.190-2.279) and osteocalcin (OR, 1.044; 95% CI, 1.002-1.088) had an increased risk of low BMD in premenopausal women. Conclusions. These results indicate that total cholesterol concentration is correlated with the levels of bone turnover markers, suggesting that it might predict osteoporosis in premenopausal women.

Original languageEnglish
Article number398397
JournalBioMed Research International
Volume2014
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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