Real-life effectiveness and safety of tofacitinib treatment in patients with ulcerative colitis: a KASID multicenter cohort study

Seung Hwan Shin, Kyunghwan Oh, Sung Noh Hong, Jungbok Lee, Shin Ju Oh, Eun Soo Kim, Soo Young Na, Sang Bum Kang, Seong Joon Koh, Ki Bae Bang, Sung Ae Jung, Sung Hoon Jung, Kyeong Ok Kim, Sang Hyoung Park, Suk Kyun Yang, Chang Hwan Choi, Byong Duk Ye

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Tofacitinib is a small molecule that inhibits Janus kinase and has been reported to be effective in Western patients with ulcerative colitis (UC). However, the real-life data on tofacitinib in Asian UC patients are limited. Objective: To investigate the real-life effectiveness and safety of tofacitinib induction and maintenance treatment in Korean patients with UC. Design: This was a retrospective study on patients with UC who received tofacitinib treatment at 12 hospitals in Korea between January 2018 and November 2020. Methods: Clinical remission at week 52, defined as a partial Mayo score of ⩽2 with a combined rectal bleeding subscore and stool frequency subscore of ⩽1, was used as the primary outcome. Adverse events (AEs), including herpes zoster and deep vein thrombosis, were also evaluated. Results: A total of 148 patients with UC were started on tofacitinib. Clinical remission rates of 60.6%, 54.9%, and 52.8% were reported at weeks 16, 24, and 52, respectively. Clinical response rates of 71.8%, 67.6%, and 59.9% were reported at weeks 16, 24, and 52, respectively. Endoscopic remission rates at weeks 16 and 52 were 52.4% and 30.8% based on the Mayo endoscopic subscore and 20.7% and 15.2% based on the UC endoscopic index of severity (UCEIS), respectively. A higher UCEIS at baseline was negatively associated with clinical response [adjusted odds ratio (aOR): 0.774, p = 0.029] and corticosteroid-free clinical response (aOR: 0.782, p = 0.035) at week 52. AEs occurred in 19 patients (12.8%) and serious AEs in 12 patients (8.1%). Herpes zoster occurred in four patients (2.7%). One patient (0.7%) suffered from deep vein thrombosis. Conclusions: Tofacitinib was an effective induction and maintenance treatment with an acceptable safety profile in Korean patients with UC. Plain language summary: Real-life effectiveness and safety of tofacitinib treatment in Korean patients with ulcerative colitis Ulcerative colitis (UC) is an idiopathic, chronic inflammatory disorder of the colonic mucosa that usually presents with bloody diarrhea and abdominal pain. Tofacitinib is a small molecule that inhibits Janus kinase and has been reported to be effective in Western patients with UC. However, real-life data on the effectiveness of tofacitinib in Asian patients with UC are limited. To investigate the real-life effectiveness and safety of tofacitinib treatment in Korean patients with UC, we retrospectively analyzed the data of 148 patients with UC who received tofacitinib treatment at 12 hospitals in Korea between January 2018 and November 2020. Clinical remission (i.e. complete improvement of symptoms) was achieved in 60.6% and 52.8% of patients at weeks 16 and 52, respectively. Endoscopic remission was achieved in 52.4% and 30.8% of patients at weeks 16 and 52, respectively. A higher baseline score of the UC endoscopic index of severity, which is one of the endoscopic indices that evaluate the severity of inflammation of the colon, was negatively associated with clinical response (i.e. partial improvement of symptoms). Adverse events (AEs) including herpes zoster and deep vein thrombosis occurred in 19 patients (12.8%) and serious AEs occurred in 12 patients (8.1%). Our real-life study shows that tofacitinib is a clinically effective treatment for Korean patients with UC, and the incidence of AEs was also similar to those observed in other real-world studies.

Original languageEnglish
JournalTherapeutic Advances in Gastroenterology
Volume16
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2023

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© The Author(s), 2023.

Keywords

  • effectiveness
  • safety
  • tofacitinib
  • ulcerative colitis

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Real-life effectiveness and safety of tofacitinib treatment in patients with ulcerative colitis: a KASID multicenter cohort study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this