Psychological needs and threat to safety: Implications for staff and patients in a psychiatric hospital for youth

Martin F. Lynch, Robert W. Plant, Richard M. Ryan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

126 Scopus citations

Abstract

For psychiatric care workers and administrators, physical threat from behaviorally dysregulated patients is an important issue tied to many others, including workers' job satisfaction, motivation, well-being, and attitude toward patients. Yet, the impact of threats to physical safety may be offset by factors in the clinical environment. The authors tested hypotheses derived from self-determination theory concerning the relations of workplace need satisfaction and perceived threat to motivation, attitudes, and well-being among clinical staff within an adolescent psychiatric inpatient hospital. Also tested were relations between need satisfaction and treatment motivation among adolescent patients. To improve the experience of psychiatric workers and their patients, clinical staff and their administrators must attend to the satisfaction of needs for autonomy, relatedness, and competence.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)415-425
Number of pages11
JournalProfessional Psychology: Research and Practice
Volume36
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2005

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