Protective factors against serious violent behavior in adolescence: A prospective study of aggressive children

Todd I. Herrenkohl, Karl G. Hill, Ick Joong Chung, Jie Guo, Robert D. Abbott, J. David Hawkins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

75 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study used data from the Seattle Social Development Project to examine factors in adolescence that affect the probability of violent behavior at age 18 among youths who received high teacher ratings of aggression at age 10. The study found a lower probability of violence among youths at age 18 was associated with attendance at religious services, good family management by parents, and bonding to school at age 15. A higher probability of later violence was associated with living in a disorganized neighborhood and having the opportunity for and involvement with antisocial peers at age 15. The likelihood of violence of age 18 among aggressive youths was reduced when they were exposed to multiple protective factors of age 15, even for those simultaneously exposed to risk factors. Implications of these findings for the development of preventive interventions during adolescence are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)179-191
Number of pages13
JournalSocial Work Research
Volume27
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2003

Keywords

  • Aggression
  • Protective factors
  • Violence
  • Youths

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