Protective Behaviors Against Particulate Air Pollution: Self-construal, Risk Perception, and Direct Experience in the Theory of Planned Behavior

Hye Kyung Kim, Yungwook Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Guided by the theory of planned behavior (TPB), this study examines how self-construal, risk perception, and direct experience change the relative importance of psychosocial motivators in predicting intentions to engage in three different protective behaviors against particulate air pollution. An online survey of 1245 South Koreans (Mage = 42.22, 50% male) showed that self-efficacy was the strongest predictor of self-protective intentions. For those who construed the self as independent and perceived a higher risk, self-efficacy was a more important determinant for protective intentions. Self-efficacy exerted less influence on the formation of behavioral intentions, for those whom risk impacted personally. This study contributes to the theoretical extension of the TPB, by addressing specific conditions under which the TPB improves its predictive power. This study also provides practical insights into communicating environmental risk and promoting self-protective behaviors against the risk.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1092-1108
Number of pages17
JournalEnvironmental Communication
Volume15
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 2021

Keywords

  • Particulate air pollution
  • protective behavior
  • risk perception
  • self-construal
  • theory of planned behavior

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