Primary Living-donor Liver Transplantation Is Not the Optimal Treatment Choice in Patients With Early Hepatocellular Carcinoma With Poor Tumor Biology

M. S. Park, K. W. Lee, H. Kim, Y. R. Choi, G. Hong, N. J. Yi, K. S. Suh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective Liver resection (LR) and living-donor liver transplantation (LDLT) are considered the two potentially curative treatments for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The aim of this study was to investigate whether there is a difference in the oncologic outcomes between LR and LDLT according to tumor biology. Methods Patients (137 LDLTs and 199 LRs) were stratified into four groups by tumor biology according to the number of risk factors for recurrence (preoperative alpha-fetoprotein >200 ng/mL, Edmonson grade 3 or 4, tumor size >3 cm, and presence of microvascular invasion). Results In the favorable tumor biology patients (groups I and II), there was a significantly worse recurrence-free survival rate in those patients who underwent LR compared to those who underwent LDLT (group I, P = .002; group II, P = .001). The overall survival rates in the LR and LDLT groups were not different (group I, P = .798; group II, P = .981). In the poor tumor biology patients (groups III and IV), there was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of recurrence-free survival rate (group III, P = .342; group IV, P = .616). The LDLT group showed a significantly lower overall survival rate (group III, P = .001; group IV, P = .025). Conclusions Primary LDLT should not be recommended in early stage HCC patients with poor tumor biology because of lower survival rates and a high chance of HCC recurrence.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1103-1108
Number of pages6
JournalTransplantation Proceedings
Volume49
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2017

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