Poisoning the information well? The impact of fake news on news media credibility

Edson C. Tandoc, Andrew Duffy, S. Mo Jones-Jang, Winnie Goh Wen Pin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examines the impact of fake news discourse on perceptions of news media credibility. If participants are told they have been exposed to fake news, does this lead them to trust information institutions less, including the news media? Study 1 (n=188) found that news media credibility decreased when participants were told they saw fake news, while news credibility did not change when participants were told they saw real news. Study 2 (n=400) found that those who saw fake news - and were told they saw a fake news post - decreased their trust in the news media while those who saw fake news and were not debriefed did not change their perceptions of the news media. This shows that the social impact of fake news is not limited to its direct consequences of misinforming individuals, but also includes the potentially adverse effects of discussing fake news.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)783-802
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Language and Politics
Volume20
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 20 Sep 2021

Keywords

  • Credibility
  • Facebook
  • Fake news
  • Journalism
  • Social media
  • Trust

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