Patterns of father involvement and child development among families with low income

Susan Yoon, Minjung Kim, Junyeong Yang, Joyce Y. Lee, Anika Latelle, Jingyi Wang, Yiran Zhang, Sarah Schoppe-Sullivan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined patterns of father involvement and their relations with social, behavioral, and cognitive development among low-income children < 5 years. Latent class analysis on data from 2650 fathers (Mage = 29.35 years) in the Supporting Healthy Marriages program revealed four father involvement patterns: (1) High positive involvement (48%); (2) engaged but harsh discipline (42%); (3) low cognitive stimulation (8%); and (4) lower involvement (2%). The low cognitive stimulation pattern was associated with greater father-and mother-reported child behavior problems and lower child socioemotional and cognitive functioning. The engaged but harsh discipline pattern was associated with more father-reported child behavior problems. These findings highlight the need for active engagement of fathers in parenting interventions to promote child development.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1164
JournalChildren
Volume8
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Funding: This research was funded by the Department of Health and Human Services Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning Research and Evaluation (grant #90PR0015). The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the study sponsors.

Funding Information:
Acknowledgments: S.Y. was supported by the National Institute of Drug Abuse through K01DA050778 (Yoon, PI).

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

Keywords

  • Behavior problems
  • Child development
  • Cognitive functioning
  • Father involvement
  • Latent profile analysis
  • Socioemotional functioning

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