Normothermia in patients with sepsis who present to emergency departments is associated with low compliance with sepsis bundles and increased in-hospital mortality rate

Sunghoon Park, Kyeongman Jeon, Dong Kyu Oh, Eun Young Choi, Gil Myeong Seong, Jeongwon Heo, Youjin Chang, Won Gun Kwack, Byung Ju Kang, Won Il Choi, Kyung Chan Kim, So Young Park, Yoon Mi Shin, Heung Bum Lee, So Hee Park, Seok Chan Kim, Sang Hyun Kwak, Jae Hwa Cho, Beongki Kim, Chae Man Lim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: To investigate the impact of normothermia on compliance with sepsis bundles and in-hospital mortality in patients with sepsis who present to emergency departments. Design: Retrospective multicenter observational study. Patients: Nineteen university-affiliated hospitals of the Korean Sepsis Alliance participated in this study. Data were collected regarding patients who visited emergency departments for sepsis during the 1-month period. The patients were divided into three groups based on their body temperature at the time of triage in the emergency department (i.e., hypothermia [< 36°C] vs normothermia [36-38°C] vs hyperthermia [> 38°C]). Interventions: None. Measurements and Main Results: Of 64,021 patients who visited emergency departments, 689 with community-acquired sepsis were analyzed (182 hyperthermic, 420 normothermic, and 87 hypothermic patients). The rate of compliance with the total hour-1 bundle was lowest in the normothermia group (6.0% vs 9.3% in hyperthermia vs 13.8% in hypothermia group; p = 0.032), the rate for lactate measurement was lowest in the normothermia group (62.1% vs 73.1% vs 75.9%; p = 0.005), and the blood culture rate was significantly lower in the normothermia than in the hyperthermia group (p < 0.001). The in-hospital mortality rates in the hyperthermia, normothermia, and hypothermia groups were 8.5%, 20.6%, and 30.8%, respectively (p < 0.001), but there was no significant association between compliance with sepsis bundles and in-hospital mortality. However, in a multivariate analysis, compared with hyperthermia, normothermia was significantly associated with an increased in-hospital mortality (odds ratio, 2.472; 95% CI, 1.005-6.080). This association remained significant even after stratifying patients by median lactate level. Conclusions: Normothermia at emergency department triage was significantly associated with an increased risk of in-hospital mortality and a lower rate of compliance with the sepsis bundle. Despite several limitations, our findings suggest a need for new strategies to improve sepsis outcomes in this group of patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1462-1470
Number of pages9
JournalCritical Care Medicine
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

Keywords

  • emergency department
  • mortality
  • normothermia
  • sepsis bundles

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Normothermia in patients with sepsis who present to emergency departments is associated with low compliance with sepsis bundles and increased in-hospital mortality rate'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this