News Repertoires and Political Information Efficacy: Focusing on the Mediating Role of Perceived News Overload

Hae Jung Oh, Zhieh Lor, Jihyang Choi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

In an era of news abundance, people increasingly feel uncertain as to whether they possess adequate information to participate in politics. However, previous research has not paid attention to the issue of such efficacy. To fill the gap, this study examines (a) how different types of news repertoire are associated with political information efficacy and (b) how perceived news overload mediates the relationship. The findings show that people have three distinct types of news repertoires, such as commentary-oriented, TV, and social media news repertoires, and those who consume news via a commentary-oriented news repertoire tend to have a higher level of political information efficacy, while the use of TV and social media news repertoires does not show significant effects on political information efficacy. In addition to that, the perceived news overload negatively mediates the link between all three types of news repertoires and political information efficacy. Two-wave original survey data were used for analyses.

Original languageEnglish
JournalSAGE Open
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2021

Keywords

  • commentary-oriented news repertoire
  • news overload
  • news repertoire
  • political information efficacy

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