Neurologic signs in relation to cognitive function in subcortical ischemic vascular dementia: A CREDOS (Clinical Research Center for Dementia of South Korea) study

Seong Hye Choi, Sangyun Kim, Seol Heui Han, Duk L. Na, Doh Kwan Kim, Hae Kwan Cheong, Jae Hong Lee, Seong Yoon Kim, Chang Hyung Hong, So Young Moon, Jay C. Kwon, Jung Eun Kim, Jee H. Jeong, Hae Ri Na, Kyung Ryeol Cha, Sang Won Seo, Yong S. Shim, Jun Young Lee, Kyung Won Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between neurologic signs and cognitive dysfunction in subcortical ischemic vascular dementia (SIVD). 121 patients with SIVD were recruited from multiple nationwide hospitals. The patients' neurologic signs were evaluated using the Focal Neurologic Sign Score (FNSS). The FNSS scores did not correlate with the composite neuropsychology scores and Korean Mini-Mental State Examination scores. The FNSS scores correlated with the letter fluency and Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure (ROCF) copy scores.Using a multivariate regression analysis controlled for age, sex, and educational level, the FNSS scores had a significant relationship with the letter fluency test scores (R2 = 0.08, b = -2.28, p = 0.02) and ROCF copy scores (R2 = 0.08, b = -0.42, p = 0.03). These findings suggest that the neurologic signs in patients with SIVD do not correlate with global cognitive functions; however, these signs do correlate with executive dysfunction in these patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)839-846
Number of pages8
JournalNeurological Sciences
Volume33
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2012

Keywords

  • Cognition
  • Executive dysfunction
  • Neurologic sign
  • Small-vessel disease
  • Subcortical ischemic vascular dementia
  • White matter changes

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