Neighborhood walkability, personal active travel, and health in Asian Americans: Does English proficiency matter?

Hyunwoo Yoon, Kwangyul Choi, Jangmin Kim, Yuri Jang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction: The present study investigated a model on how neighborhood walkability influences individual's active travelbehavior, which in turn is associated with overall health status among Asian Americans. Given that English proficiency uniquely represents racial/ethnic minorities' ability to access resources and benefits in the host society, we also examined the moderating effect of English proficiency in the relationship. Methods: Using data from the Asian American Quality of Life Survey (N = 1,447), Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) was conducted to examine the proposed mediation model of active travel in the relationship between neighborhood walkability and health. The moderating effect by English proficiency was tested using a multiple-group analysis. Results: For the entire sample, neighborhood walkability was significantly associated with a higher level of active travel (β =.269, p <.001). However, the mediation effect of active travel was not significant (indirect effect = 0.004, p =.111, 95% bias-corrected CI = −0.003–0.026). The results of the multiple group analysis showed that the neighborhood walkability was positively associated with active travel for both the English proficiency group (β =.329, p <.001) and the group with limited English proficiency (β = 0.201, p <.001). However, the mediation effect of active travel on health status was only significant in the English proficiency group (β = 0.110, p <.05), indicating that active travel influenced by the neighborhood walkability was positively associated with better health status only for the English proficiency group. Conclusions: Our findings add to the growing literature on the influence of the neighborhood walkability on individual's active travel and health status. In addition, findings provide implications for tailored interventions to promote Asian Americans' health with respect to English proficiency.

Original languageEnglish
Article number101082
JournalJournal of Transport and Health
Volume21
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2021

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 Elsevier Ltd

Keywords

  • Active travel
  • Asian Americans
  • Health
  • Neighborhood walkability

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