Maternal malnutrition affects hepatic metabolism through decreased hepatic taurine levels and changes in hnf4a methylation

Ji Eun Du, Young Ah You, Eun Jin Kwon, Soo Min Kim, Jeongae Lee, Ki Hwan Han, Young Ju Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Fetal programming implies that the maternal diet during pregnancy affects the long-term health of offspring. Although maternal diet influences metabolic disorders and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in offspring, the hepatic mechanisms related to metabolites are still unknown. Here, we investigated the maternal diet-related alterations in metabolites and the biological pathway in male offspring at three months of age. Pregnant rats were exposed to 50% food restriction during the prenatal period or a 45% high-fat diet during the prenatal and postnatal periods. The male offspring exposed to food restriction and high-fat diets had lower birth weights than controls, but had a catch-up growth spurt at three months of age. Hepatic taurine levels decreased in both groups compared to controls. The decreased hepatic taurine levels in offspring affected excessive lipid accumulation through changes in hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 A methylation. Moreover, the alteration of gluconeogenesis in offspring exposed to food restriction was observed to a similar extent as that of offspring exposed to a high fat diet. These results indicate that maternal diet affects the dysregulation in hepatic metabolism through changes in taurine levels and HNF4A methylation, and predisposes the offspring to Type 2 diabetes and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in later life.

Original languageEnglish
Article number9060
Pages (from-to)1-14
Number of pages14
JournalInternational Journal of Molecular Sciences
Volume21
Issue number23
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2020

Keywords

  • Fetal programming
  • Food restriction
  • HNF4A methylation
  • High fat diet
  • Taurine

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