Longitudinal association between deviant peer affiliation and externalizing behavior problems by types of child maltreatment

Dalhee Yoon, Susan M. Snyder, Susan Yoon, Kathryn A. Coxe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Previous research has documented that deviant peer affiliation (DP) and externalizing behavior problems (EXT) are highly related and often co-occur. However, the directionality of the association between DP and EXT remains debatable. In addition, few studies have examined the longitudinal effects of child maltreatment types on co-development of DP and EXT overtime. Therefore, this study examined the role of child maltreatment in predicting the co-development of DP and EXT. Methods: DP and EXT were assessed at ages 12, 14, and 16. DP was measured using 13 items from the modified version of the Youth Risk Behavior and Monitoring the Future Survey. EXT was measured using the Child Behavior Checklist. Each type of child maltreatment (birth to age 12) was assessed using the CPS substantiated cases. Results: The results indicated that, on average, DP increased over time, whereas EXT decreased over time. In addition, the initial levels of EXT were associated with the slope of DP. Conditional parallel-process latent growth curve modeling identified that physically abused adolescents had higher initial levels of DP and showed a slower increase in DP, while those who had been emotionally abused were associated with a steeper decrease in EXT. Conclusion: The findings offer several meaningful implications for practice. First, early assessment of and treatment for EXT may be helpful in preventing DP over time. In addition, practitioners could assess each type of maltreatment to tailor preventive interventions for early onset and ongoing development of DP and EXT.

Original languageEnglish
Article number104759
JournalChild Abuse and Neglect
Volume109
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2020

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This manuscript includes data from the Consortium of Longitudinal Studies of Child Abuse and Neglect (LONGSCAN). The LONGSCAN was funded by the Office on Child Abuse and Neglect, Children's Bureau, Administration for Children and Families, and the Department of Health and Human Services. The data were made available by the National Data Archive on Child Abuse and Neglect (NDACAN), Cornell University. The collector of the original data, the funder, NDACAN, Cornell University, and their agents or employees bear no responsibility for the analyses or interpretations presented here.

Funding Information:
This manuscript includes data from the Consortium of Longitudinal Studies of Child Abuse and Neglect (LONGSCAN). The LONGSCAN was funded by the Office on Child Abuse and Neglect, Children’s Bureau , Administration for Children and Families , and the Department of Health and Human Services . The data were made available by the National Data Archive on Child Abuse and Neglect (NDACAN), Cornell University. The collector of the original data, the funder, NDACAN, Cornell University, and their agents or employees bear no responsibility for the analyses or interpretations presented here.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 Elsevier Ltd

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • Child maltreatment
  • Deviant peer affiliation
  • Externalizing behavior problems
  • Peer relationship

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Longitudinal association between deviant peer affiliation and externalizing behavior problems by types of child maltreatment'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this