Lifelong parenting of adults with developmental disabilities: Growth trends over 20 years in midlife and later life

Eun Ha Namkung, Jan S. Greenberg, Marsha R. Mailick, Frank J. Floyd

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

This research examined how parenting adults with developmental disabilities affects parental well-being beyond midlife and into old age. Parents of adults with developmental disabilities (n = 249) and parents of adults without disabilities (n = 9,016), studied in their early 50s and mid-60s, were longitudinally tracked into their early 70s. Compared to parents of adults without disabilities, parents of adults with disabilities showed a pattern of normative functioning in their 50s, followed by poorer well-being in their mid-60s, and further declines in health and well-being into the early 70s. Aging parents who co-resided with their adult child with disabilities were particularly vulnerable, experiencing a steeper increase in depressive symptoms and body mass index (BMI) than parents whose child with disabilities lived away from home.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)228-240
Number of pages13
JournalAmerican Journal on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Volume123
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2018

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© AAIDD.

Keywords

  • Aging Parents
  • Co-residence
  • Physical Health
  • Psychological well-being

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