Labor and Delivery Simulation: Does Timing Matter?

Chong Min Hong, Sook Jung Kang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Scheduling simulation experiences for labor and delivery to promote optimal learning outcomes has not been fully investigated. Methods: This study compared self-efficacy, clinical-experience stress, and clinical-practice satisfaction between two groups of third-year nursing undergraduate students who experienced a different timing of simulations in an obstetrical rotation. One group of nursing students performed simulations before clinical practice (n = 42); a second group performed simulations after clinical practice (n = 38). Results: No significant differences emerged in scores of self-efficacy, clinical-experience stress, and clinical-practice satisfaction between the two groups. Survey questions on simulation timing demonstrated that 55 (69%) students preferred simulation practice at the end of obstetrics clinical rotations. Conclusions: Students reported individual preferences for various reasons. Nurse educators should consider students' viewpoints regarding the timing of labor and delivery simulations to provide optimal outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)24-27
Number of pages4
JournalClinical Simulation in Nursing
Volume20
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2018

Keywords

  • labor and delivery
  • nursing students
  • scheduling
  • simulation
  • timing

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