Knowledge of alzheimers disease, feelings of shame, and awareness of services among Korean American elders

Yuri Jang, Giyeon Kim, David Chiriboga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

63 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To explore predictors of knowledge of Alzheimers disease (AD), feelings of shame if a family member were to have AD, and awareness of AD-related services among Korean American elders. Method: Using data from 675 Korean American elders (mean age = 70.2, SD = 6.87), the study estimates hierarchical linear or logistic regression models. Results: Greater knowledge of AD is predicted by higher levels of education and acculturation. Feelings of shame associated with family members having AD are more likely to be reported by individuals with lower levels of education, acculturation, and knowledge of AD. Those who are married have greater levels of education and acculturation, and those who have a family member with AD are more aware of AD-related services. Discussion: The study findings underscore the pivotal role of education and acculturation in predicting knowledge of AD, feelings of shame, and awareness of AD-related services.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)419-433
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Aging and Health
Volume22
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2010

Keywords

  • Acculturation
  • Alzheimers disease
  • Korean Americans
  • Shame

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