Intrinsic motivation and the effects of self‐consciousness, self‐awareness, and ego‐involvement: An investigation of internally controlling styles

Robert W. Plant, Richard M. Ryan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

276 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study explored the relationships among dispositional self‐consciousness, situationally induced‐states of self‐awareness, ego‐involvement, and intrinsic motivation Cognitive evaluation theory, as applied to both the interpersonal and intrapersonal spheres, was used as the basis for making predictions about the effects of various types of self‐focus Public self‐consciousness, social anxiety, video surveillance and mirror manipulations of self‐awareness, and induced ego‐involvement were predicted and found to have negative effects on intrinsic motivation since all were hypothesized to involve controlling forms of regulation In contrast, dispositional private self‐consciousness and a no‐self‐focus condition were both found to be unrelated to intrinsic motivation The relationship among these constructs and manipulations was discussed in the context of both Carver and Scheier's (1981) control theory and Deci and Ryan's (1985) motivation theory

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)435-449
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Personality
Volume53
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1985

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