Interdisciplinary views of fNIRS: Current advancements, equity challenges, and an agenda for future needs of a diverse fNIRS research community

Emily J. Doherty, Cara A. Spencer, Jeremy Burnison, Marta Čeko, Jenna Chin, Lucca Eloy, Kerstin Haring, Pilyoung Kim, Daniel Pittman, Shannon Powers, Samuel L. Pugh, Demetris Roumis, Jaclyn A. Stephens, Tom Yeh, Leanne Hirshfield

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS) is an innovative and promising neuroimaging modality for studying brain activity in real-world environments. While fNIRS has seen rapid advancements in hardware, software, and research applications since its emergence nearly 30 years ago, limitations still exist regarding all three areas, where existing practices contribute to greater bias within the neuroscience research community. We spotlight fNIRS through the lens of different end-application users, including the unique perspective of a fNIRS manufacturer, and report the challenges of using this technology across several research disciplines and populations. Through the review of different research domains where fNIRS is utilized, we identify and address the presence of bias, specifically due to the restraints of current fNIRS technology, limited diversity among sample populations, and the societal prejudice that infiltrates today's research. Finally, we provide resources for minimizing bias in neuroscience research and an application agenda for the future use of fNIRS that is equitable, diverse, and inclusive.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1059679
JournalFrontiers in Integrative Neuroscience
Volume17
DOIs
StatePublished - 2023

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
Copyright © 2023 Doherty, Spencer, Burnison, Čeko, Chin, Eloy, Haring, Kim, Pittman, Powers, Pugh, Roumis, Stephens, Yeh and Hirshfield.

Keywords

  • bias
  • collaboration
  • diversity
  • fNIRS
  • human-computer interaction

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