Impacts of health expenditure financing on infant mortality and diminishing returns: Implications for sub-saharan africa

Yoorim Bang, Jinhwan Oh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: This study examines the impacts of health expenditures on infant mortality. Design/methodology/approach: This study is based on a comprehensive panel data of 100 countries (31 developed and 69 developing countries) for 18 years (2000-2017) and, based on the Hausman Test, applies fixed effect analyses. Findings: Not only a negative relationship between health expenditures and the infant mortality rate but its diminishing returns are found. This pattern turns out to be stronger in developing countries, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa. It appears that a country can easily target the most needed class or region to effectively minimize infant mortality given a limited amount of health expenditure, but that same amount may not suffice in reaching defined goals. Research limitations/implications: This implies that the rising amounts of health expenditure would be needed if countries seek to decrease infant mortality at the same rate as they had previously done. To expedite a response, multi-agency or multi-national coordination is essential, and an effective means of mobilizing resources, such as basket funding or program-based approaches, would be desirable. Originality/value: With an up-to-date dataset, this study confirms the effectiveness of health expenditure disburse-ment with its diminishing returns, which may shed light to developing countries in designing relevant policies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)25-32
Number of pages8
JournalGlobal Business and Finance Review
Volume25
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2020

Keywords

  • Diminishing Returns
  • Health Expenditure
  • Infant Mortality
  • Sub-Saharan Africa

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