Impact of white matter changes on activities of daily living in mild to moderate dementia

So Young Moon, Duk L. Na, Sang Won Seo, Jun Young Lee, Bon D. Ku, Seong Yoon Kim, Kyung Won Park, Yong S. Shim, Young Chul Youn, Chan Seung Chung, Hae Kwan Cheong, Seong Hye Choi, Kyung Ryeol Cha, Jung Eun Kim, Jee H. Jeong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

37 Scopus citations

Abstract

The association between white matter changes and activities of daily living (ADL) in a large, well-defined cohort of patients with mild-to-moderate dementia (either Alzheimer's disease or subcortical vascular dementia) were investigated. A total of 289 patients were divided into three groups (140 mild, 99 moderate, and 50 severe) depending on the degree of white matter changes as indicated on brain magnetic resonance image scans. Further, we analyzed the three groups' performances on basic and instrumental ADL. The degree of white matter changes was associated with greater age, hypertension, previous history of stroke, higher Hachinski Ischemic Score, worse global cognitive and functional status, and an increased impairment of basic ADL and instrumental ADL. The increased impairment with regard to the severe group's performance on both the basic and instrumental ADL remained significant after adjustment for age and hypertension. Tasks involving physical activities were most significant. This was the first study investigating the association between white matter changes and ADL in a large, well-defined dementia cohort. The present study suggests that severe white matter changes may be associated with higher impairment on both basic and instrumental ADL.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)223-230
Number of pages8
JournalEuropean Neurology
Volume65
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2011

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Barthel Index
  • Dementia
  • Instrumental activities of daily living
  • Ischemia
  • Vascular dementia
  • White matter changes

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