If i don't understand it, it must be new: Processing fluency and perceived product innovativeness

Hyejeung Cho, Norbert Schwarz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

26 Scopus citations

Abstract

The meta-cognitive experience of the ease or difficulty with which new information is processed, referred to as 'processing fluency', has been shown to influence a wide range of human judgments including judgments of truth and preference (e.g., Lee and Labroo 2005; Reber and Schwarz 1999; Skurnik et al. 2005; Winkielman et al. 2003). In relation to preference, high fluency has typically been found to increase subjective liking of the judgment target due to the positive feelings elicited by the fluency experience (see Winkielman et al. 2003). However, what people conclude from their meta-cognitive experiences of processing fluency should be influenced by which naïve theory of information processing they bring to bear on their fluency experience (see Schwarz 2004). The present study addresses this possibility.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)319-320
Number of pages2
JournalAdvances in Consumer Research
Volume33
StatePublished - 2006

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