HIV/AIDS stigma and religiosity among african American women

Nancy Muturi, Soontae An

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

55 Scopus citations

Abstract

African American women are disproportionately affected by HIV/AIDS compared with other ethnicities, accounting for two-thirds (67%) of all women diagnosed with HIV. Despite their increased risk of HIV infection, few studies have been conducted to understand culture-specific factors leading to their vulnerability. Given the central role of religious organizations in African American communities, this study explored whether and to what extent religiosity plays a role in stigma toward HIV/AIDS. Results of hierarchical regression showed that after controlling for key factors, religiosity was a significant factor predicting the level of religious stigma. Those with high religiosity displayed significantly higher stigma, associating HIV/AIDS with a curse or punishment from God. Verbatim responses to an open-ended question also revealed seemingly ingrained prejudice against HIV/AIDS from a religious perspective. The findings point to the important role of faith-based organizations (FBOs) in addressing HIV/AIDS issues within African American communities.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)388-401
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Health Communication
Volume15
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2010

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'HIV/AIDS stigma and religiosity among african American women'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this