Germline pathogenic variants in unselected Korean men with prostate cancer

Min Kyung So, Hyun Kyu Ahn, Jungwon Huh, Kwang Hyun Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

PURPOSE: Prostate cancer is one of the most heritable cancers and prostate cancer with germline mutations is associated with aggressive features and a poor prognosis. We investigated germline variants in unselected Korean men with prostate cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this study, we prospectively collected buccal swab DNA from 120 unselected Korean men with prostate cancer, and performed massively parallel sequencing. Identified germline variants were interpreted according to the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics/Association for Molecular Pathology 2015 guidelines. RESULTS: Of the 120 patients, 30 had regional or metastatic disease and 10, 34, 25, and 21 patients were categorized as having low, intermediate, high, or very high-risk disease, respectively. Of the 88 germline variants, 6 pathologic or likely pathogenic variants were identified in 7 patients (5.8%) with BRCA2 (1.7%), HOXB13 (1.7%), PALB2 (0.8%), ATM (0.8%), and MSH2 (0.8%). Of 7 patients, 2 possessed intermediate risk disease that was not included in the recommendation for genetic testing. We identified the Gly132Glu variant, which was different from the Gly84Glu variant of the HOXB13 gene in Western populations. CONCLUSIONS: This study presents the first analysis of germline variants in unselected Korean men with prostate cancer. Our results showed comparable germline prevalence with previous studies and provides evidence for the necessity of genetic testing in Korean men with prostate cancer.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)294-300
Number of pages7
JournalInvestigative and Clinical Urology
Volume63
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 May 2022

Keywords

  • Genetic testing
  • Germ-line mutation
  • High-throughput nucleotide sequencing
  • Prostatic neoplasms

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