Gender affects prognosis of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia differently depending on the severity of underlying disease

the Korea INfectious Diseases (KIND) study group

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3 Scopus citations

Abstract

We aimed to elucidate the potential impact of gender on prognosis of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB). We analyzed SAB cases prospectively collected over an 8-year period at 11 hospitals in Korea. SAB-related mortality was pre-defined as a death within 30 days from the onset of SAB without other apparent cause of death. The effect of gender on SAB-related mortality was examined in the entire cohort and in subgroups stratified according to methicillin resistance and Charlson’s comorbidity-weighted index (CCWI) score. Those factors independently associated to SAB-related mortality were explored. Among 1974 eligible cases, SAB-related mortality rates in male and female were 21.2% (259/1224) and 21.9% (164/750), respectively (P = 0.786). The SAB-related mortality rate was independently higher in male than that in female in CCWI score ≤ 3 methicillin-resistant SAB (MRSAB) group (15.9 vs. 6.2%; aOR 3.65, 95% CI 1.46–9.13; P = 0.006) while the association tended to be inverse when CCWI score rises. Interaction between CCWI score and gender to MRSAB-related mortality was significant in multivariate analysis (aOR 0.85, 95% CI 0.74–0.96; P = 0.011). There was no significant interaction between gender and CCWI in entire SAB or methicillin-susceptible SAB cohorts. Gender may affect clinical outcomes of MRSAB differently depending on the severity of underlying disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1119-1123
Number of pages5
JournalEuropean Journal of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases
Volume37
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jun 2018

Keywords

  • Bacteremia
  • Gender
  • MRSA
  • Mortality
  • Underlying disease

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